I thought cycling was good for me?!!

Injury prevention in cycling

So you’ve all the gear and only a vague idea; you’ve started cycling, training hard for the Cycle Derby Sportive, and you’re loving it… then some injuries start creeping in and you start to think ‘I thought this cycling malarkey was meant to be good for me!!’

Well, it is! But there are a few handy hints and tips we have for you to make sure that you last a bit longer past the Spring Sportive! With clickable exercise gifs you really have no excuse!!!

Stability:

Definiton: The ability to maintain a state of stableness, the property of a body that causes it when disturbed from a condition of equilibrium or steady motion to develop forces or moments that restore the original condition.

There are two main points that require good stability in order to put less strain on the rest of your body: your pelvis (and core muscles) and your shoulders (and shoulder-blade muscles).

Lower body stability:  Because cyclists spend all their time bent forward, I often find their glutes don’t work as well as they should. The glutes attached around the pelvis all do different jobs:

Glutes

The big one at the back is the Gluteus Maximus (GMax), and it is in charge of extending your hip (moving your hip backwards).

 Gluteus Medius (GMed) is a little bit further around the side of your pelvis and its main job is to help control the side to side movement of the pelvis and also control the direction in which your knees face. Your core (not your six pack muscles!) helps to keep your spine supported while still being mobile.

If GMax doesn’t work properly I often see people with lower back or hamstring issues resulting, as both areas try and pick up where GMax is lacking.

If GMed doesn’t work properly I tend to see people with back pain, groin pain, knee pain, and sometimes even ankle/ foot pain resulting.

Core stabilisers are made up of your diaphragm on top (no holding your breath!), transversus abdominis which wraps around you like a brace, multifidus which runs between each little bone of the spine and your pelvic floor, which is not only responsible for stopping you wet yourself (men and women!) but also adding to the stability of the whole system.

Core

If your core doesn’t work efficiently I often see people with back or hip pain resulting

Training these areas: (Click on each exercise to watch a brief video!)

Gmax: Bridges ,single leg bridges , squats, deadlifts, single leg deadliftssplit squats, step-ups, lunges (All of these can be done with weights)

Gmed: Clams (can do with theraband), side leg lifts (can do with theraband), curtseys, sumo walks (with band)

Core: Ball work (Exercise 1, Exercise 2, Exercise 3, Exercise 4, Exercise 5, Exercise 6), planks, BOSU work (Exercise 1A&B, Exercise 2A&B)

Around the clock exercise (Great for core and pelvis). 

Hamstring (can do with a straight leg too)

Abductors 

Adductors

Hip flexors

Upper body stability: Obviously the more stable your upper body is, the safer you are on the bike, but also the less the rest of you needs to compensate.

 

Your serratus anterior (SAnt) muscle helps to keep your shoulderblades under control and keep them flat against your chest wall. They are great stabilisers particularly when you’re weightbearing through your arms.

Your rotator cuff (the infraspinatus, supraspinatus, teres minor, subscapularis in the picture above!) helps control where your arm and your shoulder blade is.

The deltoid muscle is the big chunky one on the outside which is your power muscle around all the delicate structures of your shoulder. This needs to work hard when the going gets tough and the hill gets nasty and everything wants to give up!

Your trapezius (all of the parts of it) are in charge of your shoulderblade position in terms of going up/ down and in.

Your big pectoralis muscles on the front of your chest also help with the control of your arm and shoulderblade. This is a big meaty muscle and is also your champion when the going gets tough to help you control your upper body.

 

Training these areas:

SAnt: Push plus, weighted punches

Rotator Cuff: Cables/  Theraband exercises 

Deltoids: Weights/ theraband

Traps: Wall angels (make sure your back is flat against the wall along with your forearms), pull downs (yes these work your lats too), shrugs

Pecs: Chest press (weights machine), press ups, planks, plank to press up

 

Good whole body exercises:

Superman’s

Superman’s over a ball

Plank to press-up

BOSU planks

BOSU press ups

BOSU mountain climber series: Exercise 1a and 1b, Exercise 2a and 2b

 

These are only just a suggestion for you, and by no means the Holy Grail, but I never met anyone who didn’t feel better being stronger, and it definitely will make a difference on the bike.

 

Best of luck with your cycling this year!

 

Kate

Lead Physio

The Derbyshire Sporting Joint

So…. You think you over pronate…. Relax! It’s no biggy!

So…. You think you over pronate…. Relax! It’s no biggy!

 

I have lost count of the number of referrals and patients that are booked into my clinic because they think or have been told they excessively pronate.

 

Let’s clear a few things up...

Reflections of a physiotherapist in 2015

The end of another year is a chance to reflect, on life, work, goals for the future etc.

 

I started to think about all the courses and conferences I’ve been on, articles I’ve read, blogs and tweets I’ve seen, and I have to say I’m a tad confused, but also sadly worried!

 

As some background to me… I’m a South African physio who studied physiotherapy in my home country (graduating 2001), and then later on did a masters degree in Manual Therapy in Australia. I’ve worked 7 years full time in professional and international sport as team physio, and consulted thereafter to various sports. I now run a busy private practice in the UK but I work full time as a clinician. I would call myself a ‘hands-on-physio’ and up until recently I didn’t realise that was becoming a very much frowned upon thing to be. I also spend a lot of time with patients doing rehab exercises both in the clinic and the gym, and sometimes when I’m lucky enough to have the time, in their sporting environment.

SASMA Conference 2015

So back to the confusion: I went to one sports medicine conference in South Africa this year where the international lecturers spoke extensively about the use of manual therapy, demonstrated various techniques, explained that mechanotransduction takes place through exercise as well as handling of tissues. Taping methods were demonstrated. There was discussion about the use of dry needling/ acupuncture. There was extensive discussion about return to sport rehab exercises. There has also been a LOT of talk about fascia, at pretty much every conference I’ve been to for the last five years. Definitely the latest trend, and yes, it has been pointed out that fascia is exceptionally strong and we couldn’t hope to alter the structure of it. But manual therapists around the world are teaching fascial stretching and/ mobilisation techniques, and obviously they’re not affecting what they think they are affecting, but they must be doing something, or is this the biggest case ever of the ‘king’s clothing’? Do we just not yet understand the mechanisms of whatever people are doing to the tissue? Should we throw it out as the science hasn’t proven the method, or should we continue to practice the method to improve our skills at it, and hope that science catches up with us to explain why? I’m asking the question, and I don’t know the answer, other than how else do we learn?

Therapy Expo 2015

The next conference I went to was in the UK, a conference directed mainly at therapists. It very much reflected the trend certainly in the UK that ‘hands-off’ physio is the way people are moving. We are encouraged not to talk about pathology, as this can lead to chronic pain behaviour and delay healing. Now in certain parts of the population, this is exceptionally relevant. However, if you have a young sportsman who is virtually impossible to slow down, do we not want them to know that there is injured tissue? Do we not need them to realise the consequences of pushing on? I know that imaging does not equal pathology and visa versa but sometimes there IS pathology, and surely its best for the patient to understand it? For me there is nothing worse than another therapist in my clinic seeing a patient of mine and telling them all the things that are ‘wrong’ with them. What a nightmare when I’ve been building them up through their rehab! But equally, shouldn’t we be empowering patients to assist with their own condition when they fully understand what they are dealing with. There is also a strong push for patients not to be reliant on their ‘healing therapist’s hands’ which is music to all of our ears. But recently I saw a comment on social media when someone asked a physiotherapist if they would manip a joint which would help the painful area and the therapist responded with ‘I have better things to spend my time on’. Now this is possibly true, but are we not allowed to help make people feel better? I like to help people leave my rooms feeling like I have had an effect on the injured area, and while doing my evil ‘hands-on-treatment’ which god forbid makes them feel a little easier, we discuss what the plan is going forward, and then we work on the exercises they’re going to do, and I explain that should they not keep up their end of the bargain (their homework), whatever perceived ‘gains’ we have from the treatment will disappear as quickly as they have arrived. Personally I have tried to rehab an extremely serious injury with only exercise, and only after months and months of struggling on my own did I relent, make time, and get some help from a colleague, and the change was almost instantaneous! A little bit of hands on help in conjunction with what I was doing was the game changer.

There are obviously huge psychological issues involved with many patients, but often the ‘hands-on’ time allows us some insight into these issues, and although we are not psychologists, and I never even begin to say that we should act as such as it is far beyond our scope of pratice, sometimes the simple act of being able to tell someone what is most bothering you, often makes you feel better. If someone is in pain, is it not our duty to assist? And if beyond our scope to make appropriate onward referral?

 

Possibly the most disappointing thing I feel about the way in which our profession, certainly in the UK, is moving, is the disparagement of those who think differently to oneself on social media. I myself received a barrage of personal abuse (not just disagreeing with me, character attacks) from a fellow health professional on twitter who I do not know, and while I have no issue whatsoever with people disagreeing with me, the manner in which it is done should still be respectful of a colleague, and would open up to more interesting discussion. As a result I now virtually never post anything clinical on twitter for fear of another personal attack. A culture of wariness definitely exists even amongst lecturers at conferences, who anticipate the rude barrage of abuse that is often seen on social media after a lecture. And yet when it is happening to another colleague we all sit back and allow it to take place for fear of them turning on you. We can all disagree on things, and clearly I am sitting centre of one side of the the fence with regards to therapy choices, but just because we have different schools of thought does that make us wrong? My patients get better doing what I do, and yours do too. I love the fact that in my clinic I have ten different therapists who all work really differently to me, should we not be celebrating the different things we can all bring to the table rather than berating those with different philosophies? If we do not start to encourage more open discussions and support one another I am extremely concerned about the future of our profession. 

Getting to grips with back pain

I’ve been a qualified physiotherapist for over ten years now and I have heard literally thousands of people during that time talk about their ‘really bad back pain’. And to be honest, I never really got it. Patients would complain of severe, unremitting back pain that was there constantly. There was always a little part of my brain that thought, there is no way that this person has pain 24 hours a day.

The Actual Truth About Exercise

It was with much enthusiasm that many of my patients came in saying they had seen the BBC programme: Horizon: The Truth About exercise (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01cywtq) in which most people who saw the programme gleaned that they only had to do 3 minutes of exercise, once a week and all would be well. In summary  the guy did 3 minutes of High Intensity Training a week, and it changed his INSULIN SENSITIVITY. His aerobic capacity did not change as he is a ‘non-responder’ to exercise. That is all. What the programme did not claim was that 12 minutes of exercise a month gave you all the other benefits of exercise (and I’m talking 30 minutes of medium intensity exercise a day).

These benefits include:

Where injuries come from

In my practice probably the most common question I get asked is... ‘how did this happen?’, ‘where did my injury come from?’, ‘why has this happened?’ when really I think the most important thing is that we need to stop it from happening again!

My icing protocol

This is my icing protocol for an acute injury. It comes from years of experience working in professional sport, and this had the best results of any combination of icing I could find. It is brutal unfortunately, and sleep is interrupted unless you have an icing machine that comes on automatically.

To rest is to rust

I’ve pretty much heard all the sayings out there with regards to injury.. ‘if it came on it’s own, it’ll leave on it’s own’, ‘rest cures all’, ‘stretching fixes everything’. But imagine your car breaks down, you park it in the garage for 3 weeks, and then 3 weeks later expect to drive it, as normal as soon as you back it out of the driveway.., a solution to the problem? Doubtful! 

The Idiots Guide to Physiotherapy

New patients who have never had physio before are always filled with a little trepidation when coming through my door as they have no idea what to expect so I thought I would just fill you in on what to expect, and what you SHOULD expect from a visit to the physio...

Let's get moving

I see a lot of patients every day with pain, and so often their story goes... I used to go to the gym regularly, but about 3 months ago I stopped’, or ‘I just don’t have time for exercise’, or ‘I hate going to the gym because it’s boring’. My point is though, that those people are in pain for a reason: they’re weak, they’re unfit, they’re often overweight and they probably haven’t taken a deep breath in MONTHS